Delphi Gestures with TeeChart

Since Embarcadero introduced touch screen support, the way gestures are being handled has evolved. Now that we are in the RAD Studio XE8 days, it has become pretty straightforward as documented in their “Gesturing Overview” article.

DelphiGestures

That article lays out the foundation on how to work with touch gestures and controls. Applying that to TeeChart, means we’ll need TChart and TGestureManager components. TGestureManager, which manages all the gestures that can be used by the control, will have to be associated to TChart’s Touch property. There you can choose which gestures will be associated with the control. There are three kinds of gestures: standard, custom and interactive. The example discussed is based on Delphi’s interactive gestures example.

Here you can download the full project used for the article. Now I’ll explain how to create it. Before starting to write code, please do the following at design-time: add a TChart component, add a TGestureManger component, passing the gesture manager to TChart‘s Touch property and enable Zoom, Pan and DoubleTap interactive gestures on it.

Once this is done, it’s time to start typing code. First of all we’ll deactivate some TeeChart standard interactions so they don’t interfere with the functionality gestures will implement. So we will disable default zoom and panning in form’s OnCreate event:

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
var
  Series1: TSurfaceSeries;
begin
  Series1 := TSurfaceSeries.Create(Self);
  Series1.FillSampleValues(10);
  Series1.UseColorRange := False;
  Series1.UsePalette := True;
  Series1.PaletteStyle := psStrong;

  Chart1.AddSeries(Series1);
  Chart1.Zoom.Allow := False;
  Chart1.Panning.Active := False;
  Chart1.Chart3DPercent := 50;

  with TFlatTheme.Create(Chart1) do
  try
    Apply;
  finally
    Free;
  end;
end;

After that, it’s the turn of TChart‘s OnGesture event implementation:

procedure TForm1.Chart1Gesture(Sender: TObject;
  const EventInfo: TGestureEventInfo; var Handled: Boolean);
begin
  if EventInfo.GestureID = igiZoom then
    handleZoom(EventInfo)
  else if EventInfo.GestureID = igiPan then
    handlePan(EventInfo)
  else if EventInfo.GestureID = igiDoubleTap then
    handleDoubleTap(EventInfo);

  Handled := True;
end;

We are checking for TInteractiveGestures gestures performed on the chart, using event’s TGestureEventInfo, and implement a specific gesture handler method for each one. Finally, we set the Handled parameter to True so that the event is not propagated further.

Let’s speak about gesture handler methods now, starting with zoom:

procedure TForm1.handleZoom(EventInfo: TGestureEventInfo);
var
  LObj: IControl;
  chart: TChart;
  zoom: Double;
begin
  LObj := Self.ObjectAtPoint(ClientToScreen(EventInfo.Location));
  if LObj is TChart then
  begin
    if not(TInteractiveGestureFlag.gfBegin in EventInfo.Flags) then
    begin
      chart := TChart(LObj.GetObject);
      zoom := (EventInfo.Distance / FLastDIstance) * chart.Aspect.ZoomFloat;
      chart.Aspect.ZoomFloat := Max(10, zoom);
    end;
  end;
  FLastDIstance := EventInfo.Distance;
end;

Here we are implementing something different and simpler than the standard zoom in TeeChart. It’s based on the difference between the current distance and pinch that the gesture provides and the distance saved from previous calls, not allowing a zoom factor smaller than 10% of the original size.

Let’s continue with the pan gesture which, in this example, will be used for rotating the chart instead of panning it:

procedure TForm1.handlePan(eventInfo: TGestureEventInfo);
var
  LObj: IControl;
  chart: TChart;
begin
  LObj := Self.ObjectAtPoint(ClientToScreen(EventInfo.Location));
  if LObj is TChart then
  begin
    if not(TInteractiveGestureFlag.gfBegin in EventInfo.Flags) then
    begin
      chart := TChart(LObj.GetObject);

      chart.Aspect.Orthogonal := False;
      chart.Aspect.RotationFloat := chart.Aspect.RotationFloat + (EventInfo.Location.X - FLastPosition.X);
      chart.Aspect.ElevationFloat := chart.Aspect.ElevationFloat - (EventInfo.Location.Y - FLastPosition.Y);
    end;

    FLastPosition := EventInfo.Location;
  end;
end;

Similar to the pinch zoom gesture, here displacement (calculated from the screen position) is being used to rotate and elevate the chart.

Finally, the double tap gesture:

procedure TForm1.handleDoubleTap(eventInfo: TGestureEventInfo);
var
  LObj: IControl;
begin
  LObj := Self.ObjectAtPoint(ClientToScreen(EventInfo.Location));
  if LObj is TChart then
    ResetChart(TChart(LObj.GetObject));
end;

procedure TForm1.ResetChart(chart: TChart);
begin
  chart.Aspect.Orthogonal := True;
  chart.Aspect.ZoomFloat:=100;
  chart.Aspect.ElevationFloat:=345;
  chart.Aspect.RotationFloat:=345;
end;

It’s only used for resetting chart properties to their original values.

I hope this example is useful to illustrate the possibilities TeeChart has with multi-touch gesture on touch devices. It only covers a few cases but this opens up the possibility to a new world of charting interactions.

Here’s the complete code listing for the example discussed in this article:

unit Unit1;

interface

uses
  System.SysUtils, System.Types, System.UITypes, System.Classes, System.Variants,
  FMX.Types, FMX.Controls, FMX.Forms, FMX.Graphics, FMX.Dialogs,
  FMX.Controls.Presentation, FMX.StdCtrls, FMXTee.Engine, FMXTee.Procs,
  FMXTee.Chart, FMXTee.Series, FMXTee.Commander, FMX.Gestures,
  FMXTee.Series.Surface, FMXTee.Themes;

type
  TForm1 = class(TForm)
    Chart1: TChart;
    GestureManager1: TGestureManager;
    procedure FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
    procedure Chart1Gesture(Sender: TObject; const EventInfo: TGestureEventInfo;
      var Handled: Boolean);
  private
    { Private declarations }
    FLastPosition: TPointF;
    FLastDistance: Integer;
    procedure handleZoom(eventInfo: TGestureEventInfo);
    procedure handlePan(eventInfo: TGestureEventInfo);
    procedure handleDoubleTap(eventInfo: TGestureEventInfo);
    procedure ResetChart(chart: TChart);
  public
    { Public declarations }
  end;

var
  Form1: TForm1;

implementation

{$R *.fmx}

uses System.Math;

procedure TForm1.Chart1Gesture(Sender: TObject;
  const EventInfo: TGestureEventInfo; var Handled: Boolean);
begin
  if EventInfo.GestureID = igiZoom then
    handleZoom(EventInfo)
  else if EventInfo.GestureID = igiPan then
    handlePan(EventInfo)
  else if EventInfo.GestureID = igiDoubleTap then
    handleDoubleTap(EventInfo);

  Handled := True;
end;

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
var
  Series1: TSurfaceSeries;
begin
  Series1 := TSurfaceSeries.Create(Self);
  Series1.FillSampleValues(10);
  Series1.UseColorRange := False;
  Series1.UsePalette := True;
  Series1.PaletteStyle := psStrong;

  Chart1.AddSeries(Series1);
  Chart1.Zoom.Allow := False;
  Chart1.Panning.Active := False;
  Chart1.Chart3DPercent := 50;

  with TFlatTheme.Create(Chart1) do
  try
    Apply;
  finally
    Free;
  end;
end;

procedure TForm1.handleDoubleTap(eventInfo: TGestureEventInfo);
var
  LObj: IControl;
begin
  LObj := Self.ObjectAtPoint(ClientToScreen(EventInfo.Location));
  if LObj is TChart then
    ResetChart(TChart(LObj.GetObject));
end;

procedure TForm1.handlePan(eventInfo: TGestureEventInfo);
var
  LObj: IControl;
  chart: TChart;
begin
  LObj := Self.ObjectAtPoint(ClientToScreen(EventInfo.Location));
  if LObj is TChart then
  begin
    if not(TInteractiveGestureFlag.gfBegin in EventInfo.Flags) then
    begin
      chart := TChart(LObj.GetObject);

      chart.Aspect.Orthogonal := False;
      chart.Aspect.RotationFloat := chart.Aspect.RotationFloat + (EventInfo.Location.X - FLastPosition.X);
      chart.Aspect.ElevationFloat := chart.Aspect.ElevationFloat - (EventInfo.Location.Y - FLastPosition.Y);
    end;

    FLastPosition := EventInfo.Location;
  end;
end;

procedure TForm1.handleZoom(EventInfo: TGestureEventInfo);
var
  LObj: IControl;
  chart: TChart;
  zoom: Double;
begin
  LObj := Self.ObjectAtPoint(ClientToScreen(EventInfo.Location));
  if LObj is TChart then
  begin
    if not(TInteractiveGestureFlag.gfBegin in EventInfo.Flags) then
    begin
      chart := TChart(LObj.GetObject);
      zoom := (EventInfo.Distance / FLastDIstance) * chart.Aspect.ZoomFloat;
      chart.Aspect.ZoomFloat := Max(10, zoom);
    end;
  end;
  FLastDIstance := EventInfo.Distance;
end;

procedure TForm1.ResetChart(chart: TChart);
begin
  chart.Aspect.Orthogonal := True;
  chart.Aspect.ZoomFloat:=100;
  chart.Aspect.ElevationFloat:=345;
  chart.Aspect.RotationFloat:=345;
end;

end.

DashBoards and Data Visualization using Xamarin.Forms and TeeChart

DashBoards and Data Visualization using Xamarin.Forms and TeeChart

This article is going to show how easy it is to create dashboard designs to show information, especially data, by using the layouts included in Xamarin.Forms and how to use the TeeChart charting library, which fully supports Xamarin.Forms.

In this example several Charts will be added to the layout, choosing a specific design which will be adjusted for each device depending on the platform chosen.

The first step is to create a new Xamarin.Forms application (Portable)
New Project -> Visual C# -> Mobile Apps -> Blank App (Xamarin.Forms.Portable)

image1

 

Now, we’re going to add the TeeChart for Xamarin.Forms libraries as a reference to our projects to be able to use it.

Find the dlls for each specific platform on your hard disk (at the TeeChart for Xamarin.Forms installation folder). The TeeChart.PCL library also has to be referenced in all the projects.

 

Adding the TeeChart for Xamarin.Forms library as reference to the project.

 

TeeChart.PCL for the TeeChartDashBoards Portable project

TeeChart.PCL.Android.dll for the TeeChartDashBoards.Droid project

TeeChart.PCL.iOS.Unified.dll for the TeeChartDashBoards.iOS project

TeeChart.WP8.dll for the TeeChartDashBoards.WinPhone project

 

In order to make use of the TeeChart charting library we need to create a View which will contain the Chart component on it to be able to add it on our project, this “ChartView.cs” class has to be defined into the main project  (all the platforms will make use of it).

 

To create, just add a new class to the TeeCahrtDashBoards Portable project and add the following code to it :

 

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using Xamarin.Forms;

namespace TeeChartDashBoards
{
public class ChartView: View
{
public ChartView()
{
}

public EventHandler OnInvalidateDisplay;

public static readonly BindableProperty ModelProperty =
BindableProperty.Create(“ModelProperty”, typeof(Steema.TeeChart.Chart), typeof(ChartView), null);

public Steema.TeeChart.Chart Model
{
get { return (Steema.TeeChart.Chart)GetValue(ModelProperty); }
set { SetValue(ModelProperty, value); }
}

public void InvalidateDisplay()
{
if (OnInvalidateDisplay != null)
OnInvalidateDisplay(this, null);
}
}
}

 

 

Now, in order to make use of the ChartView, a renderer class is needed for each specific platform, so we’ll create a new class named “ChartViewRenderer.cs” for each platform and add the following code :

image2

This is the code for the Android project :

 

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using Android.App;
using Android.Content;
using Android.OS;
using Android.Runtime;
using Android.Widget;
using Xamarin.Forms;
using Xamarin.Forms.Platform.Android;
using Steema.TeeChart;
using TeeChartDashBoards;

[assembly: ExportRenderer(typeof(ChartView), typeof(ChartViewRenderer))]
namespace TeeChartDashBoards.Droid
{
public class ChartViewRenderer: ViewRenderer
{
protected TChart NativeControl
{
get
{
return ((TChart)Control);
}
}

protected ChartView NativeElement
{
get
{
return ((ChartView)Element);
}
}

protected override void OnElementChanged(ElementChangedEventArgs<View> e)
{
base.OnElementChanged(e);

if (Control == null)
{
var chartView = new Steema.TeeChart.TChart(Context);

chartView.Chart = NativeElement.Model;

SetNativeControl(chartView);
}

if (e.OldElement != null)
{
//unhook old events
}

if (e.NewElement != null)
{
//hook old events
}
}
}
}

 

Do the same for the iOS project, adding the following code :

 

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using Xamarin.Forms;
using Xamarin.Forms.Platform.iOS;
using TeeChartDashBoards;

[assembly: ExportRenderer(typeof(ChartView), typeof(TeeChartDashBoards.iOS.ChartViewRenderer))]
namespace TeeChartDashBoards.iOS
{
public class ChartViewRenderer : ViewRenderer<ChartView, Steema.TeeChart.TChart>
{
protected override void OnElementChanged(ElementChangedEventArgs<ChartView> e)
{
base.OnElementChanged(e);
if (e.OldElement != null || this.Element == null)
return;

var chartView = new Steema.TeeChart.TChart();

chartView.Chart = Element.Model;

SetNativeControl(chartView);
}

protected override void OnElementPropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
{
base.OnElementPropertyChanged(sender, e);
}
}
}

 

and the for the WinPhone project :

 

using TeeChartDashBoards;
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using Xamarin.Forms;
using Xamarin.Forms.Platform.WinPhone;

[assembly: ExportRenderer(typeof(ChartView), typeof(TeeChartDashBoards.WP8.ChartViewRenderer))]
namespace TeeChartDashBoards.WinPhone
{
public class ChartViewRenderer : ViewRenderer<ChartView, Steema.TeeChart.TChart>
{
protected override void OnElementChanged(ElementChangedEventArgs<ChartView> e)
{
base.OnElementChanged(e);
if (e.OldElement != null || this.Element == null)
return;

var chartView = new Steema.TeeChart.TChart();

chartView.Chart = Element.Model;
chartView.Aspect.ClipPoints = false;
chartView.Aspect.ExtendAxes = true;

SetNativeControl(chartView);
}

protected override void OnElementPropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
{
base.OnElementPropertyChanged(sender, e);
}
}
}

 

At this point, if we do “build solution” all should compile fine.

That being the case, it’s time to create a new Content Page in the main project, the initial page which will appear once the app is launched in one of the available platforms. Set “Home.cs” as the name for the page.

The solution should look like :

image3

Inside this page, the first thing we’ll do is to remove all the code that has been generated by default and will add a code that creates a Navigation page which will allow us to navigate through all the Charts inside the dashboard :

 

public Home()
{
NavigationPage.SetHasNavigationBar(this, false);
}

 

Now, we’ll define the layout, choosing the Grid layout that fits our needs. The grid layout allows one to specify the number of rows and columns to show and define the rowspan or colspan if needed (this will allow us to make the dashboard nicer) :

 

Grid grid = new Grid
{
VerticalOptions = LayoutOptions.FillAndExpand,
Padding = 5,
RowDefinitions =
{
new RowDefinition { Height = new GridLength(1, GridUnitType.Star) },
new RowDefinition { Height = new GridLength(1, GridUnitType.Star) },
new RowDefinition { Height = new GridLength(1, GridUnitType.Star) }
},
ColumnDefinitions =
{
new ColumnDefinition { Width = new GridLength(1, GridUnitType.Star) },
new ColumnDefinition { Width = new GridLength(1, GridUnitType.Star) },
new ColumnDefinition { Width = new GridLength(1, GridUnitType.Star) }
}
};

Content = grid;

 

Now it’s time to create the Charts that will be added on our dashboard. We’ll add seven Charts. First of all, we’ll create a “DashBoards” folder in the main project to add the content pages there, one for each chart. This folder has to be created one time in the main project (Portable).

Each page will define a specific chart with the Series used on it and its customised appearance. We’ll start with the content page named Page1.cs. We’ll use the following code:

 

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Reflection.Emit;
using System.Text;
using Steema.TeeChart;

using Xamarin.Forms;

namespace TeeChartDashBoards.DashBoards
{
public class Page1 : ContentPage
{
Chart dashBoard0;
public ChartView DashView0;
public Page1()
{
// NavigationPage.SetHasNavigationBar(this, false);

dashBoard0 = new Chart();
dashBoard0.Aspect.View3D = false;
Steema.TeeChart.Styles.Bar bar1 = new Steema.TeeChart.Styles.Bar();
Steema.TeeChart.Styles.Line line1 = new Steema.TeeChart.Styles.Line();
dashBoard0.Series.Add(bar1);
dashBoard0.Series.Add(line1);
//barline chart
bar1.Clear();
bar1.Add(20);
bar1.Add(50);
bar1.Add(10);
bar1.Add(70);
bar1.Add(46);
bar1.Pen.Visible = false;
bar1.BarStyle = Steema.TeeChart.Styles.BarStyles.RectGradient;
bar1.Marks.Visible = false;
bar1.Gradient.StartColor = Color.White;
bar1.Gradient.EndColor = Color.FromRgb(102, 205, 170);
bar1.Marks.Visible = true;
bar1.Marks.Shadow.Visible = false;
bar1.Marks.Color = Color.White;
bar1.Marks.Font.Size = 15;
bar1.Marks.Font.Color = Color.FromRgb(102, 205, 170);
bar1.Marks.Pen.Visible = false;
bar1.Marks.ArrowLength = 5;
bar1.Color = Color.White;

line1.Clear();
line1.Add(0, 45);
line1.Add(0.444444444444444, 55);
line1.Add(0.888888888888889, 75);
line1.Add(1.33333333333333, 65);
line1.Add(1.77777777777778, 45);
line1.Add(2.22222222222222, 80);
line1.Add(2.66666666666667, 85);
line1.Add(3.11111111111111, 98);
line1.Add(3.55555555555556, 75);
line1.Add(4, 68);
line1.Color = Color.FromRgb(255, 255, 240);

line1.LinePen.Width = 3;
line1.Smoothed = true;

dashBoard0.Panel.Color = Color.FromRgb(102, 205, 170);
dashBoard0.Panel.Gradient.Visible = false;
dashBoard0.Walls.Back.Visible = false;
dashBoard0.Title.Text = “Bars and Lines”;
dashBoard0.Title.Alignment = TextAlignment.Start;
dashBoard0.Title.Font.Size = 22;
dashBoard0.Title.Font.Color = Color.White;
//dashBoard0.Title.Font.Name = “”;
dashBoard0.Axes.Left.AxisPen.Visible = false;
dashBoard0.Axes.Bottom.AxisPen.Color = Color.White;
dashBoard0.Legend.Visible = false;
dashBoard0.Axes.Left.Grid.Color = Color.White;
dashBoard0.Axes.Left.Grid.Style = Steema.TeeChart.Drawing.DashStyle.Dot;
dashBoard0.Axes.Left.Labels.Font.Color = Color.White;
dashBoard0.Axes.Bottom.Labels.Font.Color = Color.White;
dashBoard0.Axes.Left.Increment = 25;

DashView0 = new ChartView
{
VerticalOptions = LayoutOptions.FillAndExpand,
HorizontalOptions = LayoutOptions.FillAndExpand,
};
DashView0.Model = dashBoard0;

Content = new StackLayout
{
Children = {
DashView0
}
};
}
}
}

 

The code above defines a Chart component for the page, adds some series styles to it and then set some custom aspects. I’m not going to add all the seven code pages here, as the same code structure has to be used, just that we can use other Series types and change the aspect settings as preferred. You will find the ones I have chosen by downloading the complete example at the bottom of the page. In order to follow this article do the same for other pages (Page2.cs, Page3.cs,…) as you have done for the first page.

 

 

Now that we have all the Chart styles (pages) we want to appear in our dashboard we’ll go back to the home page to add the necessary code to call each one of the pages and add it to the dashboard.

From here we call each one of the pages generated to be added to each of the cells of the grid; in this way we avoid having to recreate the charts.

First we create the seven DashBoard Charts, just before assigning the content to the grid:

 

// Create the Chart pages whose contain a specific Chart on each one
DashBoards.Page1 dashchart0 = new DashBoards.Page1();
DashBoards.Page2 dashchart1 = new DashBoards.Page2();
DashBoards.Page3 dashchart2 = new DashBoards.Page3();
DashBoards.Page4 dashchart3 = new DashBoards.Page4();
DashBoards.Page5 dashchart4 = new DashBoards.Page5();
DashBoards.Page6 dashchart5 = new DashBoards.Page6();
DashBoards.Page7 dashchart6 = new DashBoards.Page7();

 

To be able to navigate between each Content Page (available Chart pages) I’ve decided to create a button and add it to each cell. Some other ways might also work in order to execute part of code once cell is tapped, but this one allows one to do it easily, and also this way, lets us take advantage of the button class functionalities.

We need to create a button for each dashChart. Here’s the code for one of them :

 

Button button0 = new Button()
{
VerticalOptions = LayoutOptions.FillAndExpand,
HorizontalOptions = LayoutOptions.FillAndExpand,
Command = new Command(() => Navigation.PushAsync(new DashBoards.Page1()))
};

 

And now we’ll add all the Charts and buttons created to the Grid layout. I’ve chosen some specific rowspan and colspan for some cells, just to look better, but anyone can customise it their way:

 

// Grid
grid.Children.Add(dashchart0.DashView0, 0,2,0,1);
grid.Children.Add(button0,0,2,0,1);
grid.Children.Add(dashchart1.DashView1, 2,4,0,1);
grid.Children.Add(button1,2,4,0,1);
grid.Children.Add(dashchart2.DashView2, 0, 1);
grid.Children.Add(button2,0, 1);
grid.Children.Add(dashchart3.DashView3, 1, 3, 1, 2);
grid.Children.Add(button3, 1,3,1,2);
grid.Children.Add(dashchart4.DashView4, 3,4,1,3);
grid.Children.Add(button4, 3, 4, 1, 3);
grid.Children.Add(dashchart5.DashView5, 0, 2, 2, 3);
grid.Children.Add(button5, 0, 2, 2, 3);
grid.Children.Add(dashchart6.DashView6, 2, 2);
grid.Children.Add(button6, 2, 2);

 

The last steps are to modify the App.cs class. This one needs to call the Home.cs content page :

 

public App()

{
// The root page of your application
MainPage = new NavigationPage(new Home());
}

 

We’ve also to modify the MainPage.xaml.cs page in order for it to work fine on WinPhone :

 

public MainPage()
{
InitializeComponent();

Forms.Init();
Content = new TeeChartDashBoards.Home().ConvertPageToUIElement(this);
}

 

Now we’re going to try to do a build for all the projects, run the app on each platform (IOS, Android y WinPhone) and see the results.

 

The source code of this example can be downloaded from the Steema GitHub page.

 

The result should look like:

grid

 

TeeChart NET for iOS and Xamarin.iOS Unified API

As you know the TeeChart NET for iOS have been available since the first MonoTouch version created by Xamarin team. The TeeChart product allows to add professional Charts to your apps easily.

With a very few lines of code you can create the Chart, customize it, set a DataSource for the data and add as a View to the app. You just need to reference to the TeeChart.IOS dll and start working with it. Here you can find an article which shows how to display data from SQLite database into the Chart. This all using a Classic Xamarin iPnone project and the MonoTouch API.

Now Xamarin has introduced the new Xamarin.iOS Unified API. This new api allow to support 32 and 64 bit applications with the same binary. See more info about the Unified API here.

In order to continue supporting all the available Xamarin options, Steema has prepared the new TeeChart NET for Xamarin.iOS Unified version. Now both (the Classic and UInified versions) are included into the TeeChart NET for Xamarin.iOS product, so you can decide which one to use depending on your needs.

You can download the new installer at the customers download page or at the Evaluation versions page.

Here I’m going to show how to create a small dashboard application which uses several Charts on it by using the new Xamarin.iOS Unified and the TeeChart.iOS.Unified versions.

All from the Xamarin Studio IDE.

1) Creating the new Xamarin.iOS app from Xamarin Studio :
Open Xamarin Studio and go to File -> New -> Solution and then select c# -> iOS -> Unified API -> iPhone -> Single View Application.

TeeChartNET_IOS_Unified_1
2) Adding the TeeChart NET for Xamarin.iOS reference to the project :
Right click over the Project references and click “Add references”. Find the TeeChart.iOS.Unified.dll on your hard disk and add it to the the project references.

TeeChartNET_IOS_Unified_2
3) Adding code to the App’s RootViewController :
In order to add some Charts to our application we have to add the using Steema.TeeChart to the top of the unit :

using Steema.TeeChart;
Then create and customize the Charts inside the main View. First we define all the Chart View object we’re going to use, and also an image which will be used to load the logo.


TChart chart1;
TChart chart2;
TChart chart3;
TChart chart4;
UIImageView imageview;

Inside the ViewDidLoad method we’ll create all the Charts, create the Series we want to use and set the specific aspect and features for each Chart. We’ll add the following code :


public override void ViewDidLoad()
{
base.ViewDidLoad();

// Create the Chart View objects
chart1 = new TChart();
chart2 = new TChart();
chart3 = new TChart();
chart4 = new TChart();

// Setting specific frame for each Chart
CoreGraphics.CGRect r1 = this.View.Frame;
r1.Height = r1.Height / 4;
r1.Y = (r1.Height*3)-50;
chart1.Frame = r1 ;

CoreGraphics.CGRect r4 = this.View.Frame;
r4.Height = r4.Height / 4;
r4.Y = (r4.Height*2)-50;
chart4.Frame = r4 ;

CoreGraphics.CGRect r2 = this.View.Frame;
r2.Height = r2.Height / 2 - 50;
r2.Width = r2.Width / 2;
r2.Y = 0;
chart2.Frame = r2 ;

CoreGraphics.CGRect r3 = this.View.Frame;
r3.Height = r3.Height / 2 - 50;
r3.Width = r3.Width / 2;
r3.X = r3.Width;
r3.Y = 0;
chart3.Frame = r3 ;

// Adding Series and features for Chart 1
chart1.Series.Add (new Steema.TeeChart.Styles.Volume ());
chart1.Series [0].FillSampleValues ();
chart1.Aspect.View3D = false;
chart1.Axes.Bottom.Grid.Visible = false;
chart1.Legend.Visible = false;
chart1.Axes.Left.Visible = false;
chart1.Panel.Gradient.Visible = false;
chart1.Panel.Color = UIColor.Black.CGColor;
chart1.Walls.Back.Transparent = true;
chart1.Legend.Visible = false;
chart1.Axes.Bottom.Labels.Font.Color = UIColor.FromRGB (220, 220, 220).CGColor;

// Adding Series and features to the Chart 2
Steema.TeeChart.Styles.CircularGauge gauge1 = new Steema.TeeChart.Styles.CircularGauge ();
chart2.Series.Add (gauge1);
chart2.Axes.Left.Labels.Font.Size = 5;
gauge1.Frame.Width = 15;
gauge1.Ticks.VertSize = 3;
gauge1.Center.Shadow.Visible = false;
gauge1.Axis.AxisPen.Visible = false;
gauge1.FaceBrush.Gradient.Visible = false;
gauge1.FaceBrush.Color = UIColor.FromRGB(220,220,220).CGColor;
gauge1.Hand.Color = UIColor.FromRGB (255, 65, 56).CGColor;
gauge1.Hand.Gradient.Visible = false;
gauge1.Hand.Shadow.Visible = false;
gauge1.Axis.AxisPen.Visible = false;
gauge1.Value = 75;
gauge1.Ticks.VertSize = 3;
chart2.Panel.Gradient.Visible = false;
chart2.Panel.Color = UIColor.Black.CGColor;
chart2.Panel.MarginTop = 0;
chart2.Panel.MarginLeft = 0;
chart2.Panel.MarginBottom = 0;
chart2.Panel.MarginRight = 0;

// Adding Series and features to the Chart 3
Steema.TeeChart.Styles.CircularGauge gauge2 = new Steema.TeeChart.Styles.CircularGauge ();
chart3.Series.Add (gauge2);
chart3.Axes.Left.Labels.Font.Size = 5;
gauge2.Frame.Width = 15;
gauge2.Ticks.VertSize = 3;
gauge2.Axis.AxisPen.Visible = false;
gauge2.Center.Shadow.Visible = false;
gauge2.FaceBrush.Gradient.Visible = false;
gauge2.FaceBrush.Color = UIColor.FromRGB(220,220,220).CGColor;
gauge2.Hand.Color = UIColor.FromRGB (255, 65, 56).CGColor;
gauge2.Hand.Gradient.Visible = false;
gauge2.Hand.Shadow.Visible = false;
gauge2.Axis.AxisPen.Visible = false;
gauge2.Value = 50;
gauge2.Ticks.VertSize = 3;
chart3.Panel.Gradient.Visible = false;
chart3.Panel.Color = UIColor.Black.CGColor;
chart3.Panel.MarginTop = 0;
chart3.Panel.MarginLeft = 0;
chart3.Panel.MarginBottom = 0;
chart3.Panel.MarginRight = 0;

// Adding series and features for the Chart 4
chart4.Series.Add (new Steema.TeeChart.Styles.Line ());
chart4.Series.Add (new Steema.TeeChart.Styles.Line ());
chart4.Series.Add (new Steema.TeeChart.Styles.Line ());
chart4.Series [0].FillSampleValues (20);
chart4.Series [1].FillSampleValues (20);
chart4.Series [2].FillSampleValues (20);
chart4.Series [0].Marks.Visible = false;
chart4.Series [1].Marks.Visible = false;
chart4.Series [2].Marks.Visible = false;
(chart4.Series [0] as Steema.TeeChart.Styles.Line).LinePen.Width = 3;
(chart4.Series [1] as Steema.TeeChart.Styles.Line).LinePen.Width = 3;
(chart4.Series [2] as Steema.TeeChart.Styles.Line).LinePen.Width = 3;
chart4.Aspect.View3D = false;
chart4.Axes.Bottom.Increment = 3;
chart4.Panel.Gradient.Visible = false;
chart4.Panel.Color = UIColor.Black.CGColor;
chart4.Walls.Back.Transparent = true;
chart4.Legend.Visible = false;
chart4.Axes.Left.Visible = false;
chart4.Axes.Botto.Labels.Font.Color = UIColor.FomRGB (220, 220, 220.CGColor;

// Adding Chart views to the main View
this.View.AddSubview(chart1);
this.View.AddSubview(chart2);
this.View.AddSubview(chart3);
this.View.AddSubview(chart4);

// Setting general properties for alll the Charts
chart1.Header.Visible = false;
chart2.Header.Visible = false;
chart3.Header.Visible = false;
chart4.Header.Visible = false;

this.View.BackgroundColor = UIColor.Black;

// Adding logo to the App
imageview = new UIImageView (UIImage.FromBundle ("logo.png"));
CoreGraphics.CGRect rimage = new CoreGraphics.CGRect(95,this.View.Frame.Height-50,this.View.Frame.Width/2-30,50);

imageview.Frame = rimage;
this.View.AddSubview (imageview);
}

Before to try to cmpile and run the app, we’ll have to add the “logo.png” image at the “Resources” folder of our project.

Once this has been done, we can try to run our application, and the result should look like the following image :

TeeChartNET_IOS_Unified_3

 

You can download the source code of this example here.

Small tool to create icons and png images for iOS and Android Firemonkey applications

Yet another tool to create the *.png images required by Firemonkey iOS and Android application splash images.

Download source code  (65KB, for Embarcadero RAD Studio XE4 up to XE7)

(Main *.pas unit is aprox 200 lines of code, easy to modify to suit your needs)

Currently this tool generates 42 images of different sizes:

screenshot

Notes:

The sample project uses an FMX 3D form containing a sample “logo”. This can be replaced to use a normal image instead. Using a 3D form might produce better output quality as texts and graphics are regenerated from vector data every time for each icon dimension, instead of stretching a single “big” bitmap.

The *.ico file for Windows projects is created containing a single image.
You can use Gimp or IcoFX to create a multiple ico file using the generated *.png images.

See this great article about creating multi-icon *.ico files for Windows applications from Simon Stuart’s OTAPI.com:

http://otapi.com/2014/09/28/making-windows-icons-for-rad-studio-applications/

 

The *.icns file for Mac OSX applications is not created as it has several complex requeriments (a shell command line tool must be used in the Mac machine) explained here:

https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/GraphicsAnimation/Conceptual/HighResolutionOSX/Optimizing/Optimizing.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP40012302-CH7-SW3

 

GIS Map layers example using TeeChart World series (VCL and Firemonkey)

TeeChart Pro includes World and Map series classes to visualize GIS (Geographical) data, with several ways to create or import “layers” made from ESRI(tm) SHP ShapeFiles, Google KML paths and simple Placemark text files.

See below the link to download the source code of an identical example for VCL and Firemonkey (FMX) frameworks, for Delphi 7 up to Embarcadero RAD Studio XE6 ides.

TeeChart_GIS_ESRI_KML_World_Map_Shapes_screenshot

Download:

Source code example projects (VCL and Firemonkey) and ready-to-run executable demos.

Readme:

This example shows how to use different TeeChart Series as “layers”
to visualize different kinds of data.

-TeeChart World and Map series (polygons, shapes)

-Google Maps KML http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keyhole_Markup_Language

-ESRI(tm) ShapeFiles

-Simple *.txt files containing placemarks

As each “layer” is a normal Series, it can be shown or hidden individually,
and fully customized as usually (visual formatting, series data, etc)

Copyright notices:

Dataset file: ne_50m_urban_areas.shp

“Made with Natural Earth. Free vector and raster map data @ naturalearthdata.com”

Route 66 KML path file:
http://route66map.publishpath.com/google-map

Nuclear Power Plants KML:
https://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF8&msa=0&output=kml&msid=211748341523244283833.00045902e10d2ec3bf089

 

Delphi Inspect, simple free tool to view FireMonkey and RTL System parameters.

Icon_144

NEW: Updated version compiled with Embarcadero Studio XE 10.1 Berlin “Update 1” (September 2016).

This small app shows a very big quantity of global parameters (variables, class variables, class properties, “service managers” interface values)  from Delphi RTL System units, FireMonkey classes and platform-specific parameters (Android, iOS, Mac OSX and Windows x86 and x64).

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.steema.Delphi_Inspect

It also includes benchmarks for the TCanvas graphical methods to test the GPU speed of your Android / iOS mobile device, and Windows / Mac desktop graphics card, as well as basic system benchmarks (TObject, Math, Arrays, I/O) and the new TParallel threading multi-cpu class in XE7.

 

Screenshot_2014-07-31-17-28-38  Screenshot_2014-08-04-13-08-39 Screenshot_2014-08-04-13-08-19

 

The very same source code compiles for Windows x86 32bit, x64, Mac OSX, iOS and Android.

Source code for Embarcadero RAD Studio:

Download Latest version  v6.0 Sep-29th 2016

Older version for XE5 and XE6: Download

Usage:

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Uses InspectDelphi;
 
var s : TStringList;
 
s:=TStringList.Create;
 
TInspectDelphi.AddAll(s);
 
.... do your work with "s" ....
 
s.Free;
Uses InspectDelphi;

var s : TStringList;

s:=TStringList.Create;

TInspectDelphi.AddAll(s);

.... do your work with "s" ....

s.Free;